Final Reflection

In the last three years, I have tried to engage in the Digital Humanities in three ways. When I first applied to graduate school at MSU and visited the campus I was told about LEADR and MATRIX. Having run more than my share of blogs and websites into complete silence in the past, the presence […]

Read more

HASTAC Revision

Rubric: Context and argument: What is the object of study and why is it important? Is it original? How is this project particularly suited to the digital medium? How and what does the project contribute to the field at large? Does the website have an interpretative element? Evidence/sources:What kind of evidence does the project showcase? How and […]

Read more

On scholarly communication

Scholarly communication has fundamentally been altered in the digital realm. On the one hand, digital scholarship is far more accessible in format (and sometimes language too) than traditional academic scholarship (note also no paywalls). One of the most prominent examples of publicly engaged scholarship is the Network in Canadian History and Environment(NiCHE). Established in 2004 by […]

Read more

Open access?

Open access is an important if contentious issue in academia. At its most fundamental level, open access raises questions about the value of academic labor in an increased market-oriented academic economy. It does not question that academic production comes at a cost; it questions if that cost needs to be necessarily passed on to the […]

Read more

DH Learning and Teaching

Developing a digitally inflected teaching exercise The class I would probably teach is HST 391: Environmental History of North America which is primarily a lecture-based class run every spring. As an environmental historian, this class would be a delight to teach. Since it is a 300-level class, it will not be a large class. To […]

Read more

Beginnings of an idea

Below are the beginnings of a proposal for a grant to fund my final project. Abstract This project will involve the creation of an open access website which will aim to juxtapose the Underground Railroad in the Detroit River region with historical mapping data, land use data as well as archival material on both sides […]

Read more

Visualizations and Challenges

In his piece Theibault remarks that the “key dimensions of a visualization are the density and the transparency of its information.” This particular insight has long plagued/guided what I think about visualizations. While this is not, as Theibault, a new problem vexing historians, there are new ways of alleviating it. In the past I have […]

Read more

Mapping places and things

As someone who thinks visually, I really enjoyed the using these tools and the concomitant challenges they threw up. They reemphasized some of issues about my data sets that I have long known, as well as outlining potentially creative means to overcome these limitations. First about my data set: as a series of numbers and […]

Read more